Master's Course Descriptions

MAcOM ACUPUNCTURE STUDIES AND CHINESE MEDICINE FUNDAMENTALS

The following contains comprehensive description of the master’s courses offered within the AOMA MAcOM and DAcOM curricula. Within the five academic departments, the master's-level courses have been organized from basic to advanced. For each course, the course number and name are listed, along with all co- and prerequisite courses. A key to the number of didactic, practical and clinical hours, and quarter credits for each course is listed below the course number.

Keys can be read in the following manner: Didactic hours/practical hours/clinical hours/quarter credits.

Credit Hours

Each didactic quarter credit is equivalent to 12 hours of in-class instruction. Each clinical internship or externship quarter credit is equivalent to 24 hours of instruction. 

Terms Offered

The terms in which a course is typically offered are listed in each course description. It is important to note that course offerings  may vary from term to term and may not necessarily adhere to the schedules listed below. Students are encouraged to meet with an academic advisor each term, prior to  registration.

DAcOM pre/co-requisites for admissions

MAcOM students and graduates of master of acupuncture and Oriental medicine programs applying for the DAcOM program must have official undergraduate transcripts detailing credit for biology, chemistry, and psychology. These three courses may be completed  at AOMA while doing degree coursework, provided the course prerequisite and co-requisite structure is adhered to. Alternatively, equivalent courses may be taken for credit at regionally accredited  or ACAOM-accredited institutions and proof provided on official transcripts. The following courses at AOMA fulfill this requirement: WS0104 Medical Biology, WS0105 Medical Biochemistry, and PT0101 Psychology and Clinical Communications. These course do not count towards degree completion.

The following pages contain comprehensive listings of the master’s and doctoral courses offered within the AOMA curriculum. Within the five academic departments, the MAcOM courses have been organized from basic to advanced. The doctoral courses are

listed according to the divisions of specialty of practice, inquiry, professionalism and leadership, and clinical practice. For each course, the course number and name are listed, along with all co- and prerequisite courses. A key to the number of didactic, practical and clinical hours, and quarter credits for each course is listed below the course number.

Keys can be read in the following manner:

Didactic hours/practical hours/clinical hours/quarter credits.

 [LH1]This goes directly in front of the first course description (AT0100)

Foundations in TCM

The foundations and diagnostic skills of traditional Chinese medicine are the cornerstone of Chinese medical science. This theoretical system forms the basis for clinical practice. The well rounded and comprehensive acupuncture curriculum builds on these fundamentals, creating a strong foundation for other didactic instruction and for clinical internship.

AT0100  Introduction to Palpation

0/12/0/0.5  Prereq.: None Terms Offered: Fall, Winter

The principle focus of this course is to introduce and develop palpation skills necessary for anatomical location, point location, assessment, and ultimately clinical practice. In addition, this course develops the novice’s ability to feel qi sensations through basic awareness and qigong exercises, to cultivate awareness of self and others, to attune to psychosocial cultures around touch, and to gain permission to touch through verbal and non-verbal cues. These skills will continue to develop throughout the program in two more palpation skills courses and in courses on point location, needling techniques, Asian bodywork, anatomy, and physical assessment, and throughout clinical practice.

AT0101 Foundations of Chinese Medicine 1

36/0/0/3 Prereq.: None

Terms Offered: Summer, Fall, Winter

An introductory course providing in-depth study of the philosophy and theories fundamental to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), including the essential principles of yin and yang, Dao, five elements, and zangfu organ systems. Chinese medical history as it relates to the various traditions in acupuncture and Oriental medicine will be covered, as well as historical and professional trends in acupuncture and Oriental medicine.

AT0102 Foundations of Chinese Medicine 2

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: AT0101 Terms Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

This course builds upon AT0101 with an emphasis on the production and function of body substances (energy, blood, body fluid, essence, spirit) and the related internal organ systems, as well as etiology and pathology, sources of pathogens, and mechanisms of illness, with an introduction to the channel  system.

AT0103  Diagnostic Skills of Chinese Medicine 1

24/12/0/3  Prereq.: AT0102

Terms Offered: Winter, Spring, Summer

This is the first of two courses providing in-depth study and practical application of the four diagnoses with an emphasis on tongue and pulse evaluation, diagnosis, and basic pattern differentiation.

AT0200  Diagnostic Skills of Chinese Medicine 2

24/12/0/3  Prereq.: AT0103

Terms Offered: Spring, Summer, Fall

Second course emphasizing full differential diagnosis of syndromes, including zangfu, eight principles, six stages, four levels, san jiao, and microsystems, with a focus on case  studies.

RQ0126  Foundations Competencies

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: AT0202, AT0212, AT221, HT0200, MB0101, MB0301, WS0201, WS0311

Co-req.: PT0400, PT0440

Terms Offered: All Terms

This is an online guided study to prepare students for the NCCAOM Foundations of Oriental Medicine Board Exam. After using the documents and voice-over power points, the student takes AOMA’s Foundations Competency Exam. Passing the competency exams for foundations, acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, and biomedicine is required graduation and before AOMA will release the student’s transcript to NCCAOM. There is no cost for this course, and the competency exam may be retaken until passed.

RQ0129  NCCAOM Board Exams Preparation

36/0/03  Co-req.: RQ0125, RQ0126, RQ0127, RQ0128

Terms Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

This in-classroom course complements the online guided study competencies courses. Senior faculty refresh and review knowledge necessary for successful completion of the four NCCAOM board exams. Intended for students to take in their last term or term-before last term of the MAcOM program.

Acupuncture

AT0111  Point Location and Meridian Theory 1

24/12/0/3  Co-req.: AT0100, AT0101, WS0101

Terms Offered: Fall, Winter

First of three courses on the distribution and functions of the network of channels and collaterals, categories of special points, body landmarks, point locating methods, and basic needling methods. Includes practice of physical point location. First course covers points on the lung, large intestine, stomach, spleen, and heart channels.

AT0112  Point Location and Meridian Theory 2

24/12/0/3  Prereq.: AT0111

Co-req.: AT0102

Terms Offered: Winter, Spring

Second course in the series covering the points and channels of small intestine, urinary bladder, kidney, pericardium, sanjiao, and gall bladder.

AT0113  Point Location and Meridian Theory 3

24/12/0/3  Prereq.: AT0111 Terms Offered: Spring, Fall

Final course in the series covering the points and channels of gall bladder (continued), liver, du/governing, ren/conception, and the other extraordinary channels, commonly used extra points, and point location comparisons.

AT0131  Acupuncture Techniques 1

24/12/0/3  Co-req.: AT0100, AT0101, AT0111, WS0101

Terms Offered: Fall, Winter

First of two introductory  practical  courses  providing  basic techniques of needling, including the angle, depth, manipulation, and withdrawal of needles, and bu/tonification and xie/sedation. Covers the treatment of acute and chronic conditions, first aid, management of adverse reactions, prevention and treatment of acupuncture accidents, infection control, safety issues, sterilization procedures, CNT, OSHA, and HIPAA protocols.

AT0132  Acupuncture Techniques 2

24/12/0/3  Prereq.: AT0131

Co-req.: AT0211,  WS0103, WS0311

Terms Offered: Fall, Winter

The second of two introductory practical courses providing basic techniques of needling, moxibustion, cupping, and other special acupuncture techniques, such as cutaneous needling, three-edge needling, electric needling, and guasha. Students are advised to take this course in the term prior to beginning internship.

AT0191  Meridian and Point Energetics 1

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: AT0101, AT0111

Co-req.: AT0102

Terms Offered: Winter, Spring

First of two courses  introducing  fundamental theories  and usage of acupuncture therapy, including meridian theory, special energetics, and individual acupuncture point energetics. First course covers the lung, large intestine, stomach, spleen, heart, and small intestine meridians, including the shu points, five

element points, luo connecting points, yuan source points, and xi-cleft points.

AT0192  Meridian and Point Energetics 2

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: AT0191 Terms Offered: Spring, Fall

Second course in the series of two courses, covering urinary bladder, pericardium, sanjiao, gall bladder, liver, ren, and du meridians, and  how to select basic acupuncture points in order to therapeutically affect corresponding patterns of  disease.

AT0202  Advanced Needling Techniques and Theory

24/12/0/3  Prereq.: AT0112, AT0113, AT0191, AT0192,  AT0132

Terms Offered: Winter, Spring

This advanced practical course provides for further study of acupuncture techniques and the indication and functions of various techniques for clinical application. This course includes scalp acupuncture, auricular acupuncture, and various classical techniques from the Neijing and Nanjing  classics.

AT0211  Acupuncture Treatment of Disease 1

24/12/0/3  Prereq.: AT0112, AT0113, AT0191,  AT1092

Terms Offered: Fall, Winter

This is the first of three courses focusing on the etiology, mechanism, differentiation, and treatment of certain diseases, including TCM framework, strategies, and  principles  of treatment. Attention is given to clinical skills regarding treatment plans, prognosis, contraindications, appropriate  referrals, risk  factors, modification to standard therapeutic approaches in certain conditions, and seemingly benign presentations that may have a more serious cause. The first course covers respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine, and reproductive systems.

AT0212  Acupuncture Treatment of Disease 2

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: AT0211, AT0132

Terms Offered: Winter, Spring

The second course on the treatment of specific diseases, covering reproductive (continued), urinary, nervous, and alimentary systems, as well as liver and gall bladder disorders, and case-study discussions.

AT0213  Acupuncture Treatment of Disease 3

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: AT0211, AT0132 

Terms Offered: Spring, Fall

This is the final course on the treatment of specific diseases, covering immune and musculoskeletal systems, as well as psychosocial disorders, skin, hair, and nail problems, and miscellaneous illnesses. Includes certain advanced techniques, case analyses, and written  studies.

RQ0125  Acupuncture Competencies

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: AT0202, AT0212, AT221, HT0200, MB0101, MB0301, WS0201, WS0311

Co-req.: PT0400, PT0440

Terms Offered: All Terms

This is an online guided study to prepare students for the NCCAOM Acupuncture Board Exam. After using the documents and voice-over power points, the student takes AOMA’s Acupuncture Competency Exam. Passing the competency exams for foundations, acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, and biomedicine is required graduation and before AOMA will release the student’s transcript to NCCAOM. There is no cost for this course, and the competency exam may be retaken until  passed.

Asian Bodywork Therapy

AOMA believes that touch is an integral part of healing and has incorporated a strong Asian bodywork therapy component into the program. The Asian bodywork therapy curriculum is based in the philosophy and application of Chinese medicine and the harmonization of qi. Students have two forms of Asian bodywork therapy from which to choose: tuina and Chinese medical qigong. Students may also elect optional courses in Asian bodywork therapy, which, upon completion, qualify the student to apply for membership to the American Organization for Bodywork Therapies of Asia (AOBTA®).

Tuina, the Ancient Healing Bodywork of China

Tuina originates in China. It is a traditional meridian and acupoint bodywork therapy that is more than 2,000 years old. It involves a variety of techniques including rolling, tapping, and pressure for treating a broad range of disorders. Students may choose to take either ABT03 Tuina 3 or ABT03A Chinese Pediatric Tuina to fulfill the Asian bodywork requirement for graduation.

ABT01  Tuina 1

18/18/0/3  Prereq.: None

Co-req.: AT0101

Terms Offered: Varies

This course provides a working knowledge of basic tuina techniques and tuina exercises, yijinjing (sinew exercise), to strengthen the body’s constitution. The course is designed to strengthen the connection between tuina and other methods and techniques of Oriental medicine.

ABT02  Tuina 2

18/18/0/3  Prereq.: ABT01 Terms Offered: Varies

This course continues the practice of tuina techniques and the general body routine of tuina. It focuses on the etiology, pathology, and symptomology of disorders of the neck and upper limbs, as well as the integration of tuina with both Oriental and biomedical evaluation and treatment methods of common disorders.

ABT03  Tuina 3

18/18/0/3  Prereq.: ABT01 Terms Offered: Varies

This course continues the practice of specific tuina techniques as well as general body routine of tuina. It focuses on the etiology, pathology, and symptomology of disorders of the back and lower limbs. Further, it addresses the integration of tuina with both Oriental and biomedical evaluation and treatment methods of common disorders.

ABT03A  Chinese Pediatric Tuina

18/18/0/3  Co-req.: ABT01 Terms Offered: Varies

This course is designed to provide students with basic methods used in pediatric tuina, frequently used pediatric points, and pediatric tuina for common infantile diseases. Commonly used techniques, special classic techniques, and basic pediatric points will be introduced, demonstrated, and practiced in class.

Chinese Medical Qigong

Chinese medical qigong is one of the oldest branches of Chinese medicine, predating acupuncture by thousands of years. It is a therapeutic method for improving health and wellbeing, regaining and maintaining mind–body balance,  preserving health, and enhancing longevity through the training of the mind, the breath, and the physiological processes of the body.

ABQ01  Chinese Medical Qigong 1

18/18/0/3  Prereq.: None

Co-req.: AT0101

Terms Offered: Varies

The three courses of this series present a comprehensive study of Chinese medical qigong and include the philosophy of qigong as well  as exercises and movements which focus on cultivating internal energy. A series of traditional and modern qigong exercises is taught throughout these courses, including meditation (static qigong) and daoyin (dynamic qigong), for the purpose of training and refining  inner energy. Focus of this first course is on the mechanisms of qigong and the relationship between the three treasures of the human being: essence, energy, and spirit. The course also focuses on commonly used points and qigong safety, theory, and methods. Attention will be paid to the areas of combining Chinese medical qigong with zangfu, yin–yang, and meridian theories to improve students’ understanding of Oriental medicine and to integrate qigong methods with Oriental medical therapies.

ABQ02  Chinese Medical Qigong 2

18/18/0/3  Prereq.: ABQ01 Terms Offered: Varies

This course covers the sensation of qi, a foundation of internal qi, and guidance of qi throughout the body. Additionally, the origin and distribution of the twelve regular meridians and location of major acupressure points will be studied. The course focuses on the proper recommendation of exercises for improving wellbeing and relieving symptoms of chronic disorders, particularly tendinomuscular problems. The selection of different qigong exercises according to body constitutions and various syndromes will also be presented.

ABQ03  Chinese Medical Qigong 3

18/18/0/3  Prereq.: ABQ01 Terms Offered: Varies

The third course of the Chinese medical qigong series focuses on the directing and renewing of qi. This is achieved by exploring the major principles that govern the universal and environmental energetic structures, as well as their influence on the human body, mind, spirit, and emotions. A series of qigong exercises and techniques, tongue inspection and pulse evaluation, touching and non-touching techniques, color and temperature observation, and healing sounds are practiced for a better understanding of this specialized system.

Mind-Body Studies

AOMA believes that the internal development of qi facilitates focus and concentration and therefore enhances students’ educational experience. Additionally, students learn corrective and therapeutic exercises for self-care and as an additive to the treatment plans of their patients.

MB0101  Taiji 1 0/12/0/1              

Prereq.: None

Terms Offered: Varies

This is the first of three courses providing a basic understanding of and practical experience in a taiji form and the philosophical principles of circular movements. This first course covers the first section of a taiji form and assists students with achieving greater flexibility and concentration, along with an ability to sense the flow of energy. Students will explore the benefits of taiji and its application to healthcare and disease prevention, as well as its indications for the respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, metabolic, motor, tendinomuscular, nervous, and immune systems. Attention is paid to integrating taiji with acupuncture and Oriental medicine for healthcare, balance of the body, and disease prevention.

MB0102  Taiji 2

0/12/0/1  Prereq.: MB0101

Terms Offered: Varies

This course covers the second section of a taiji form with a deeper study of the philosophical principles and a review of the first section.

MB0103  Taiji 3

0/12/0/1  Prereq.: MB0102

Terms Offered: Varies

This is the third course of the taiji series, covering the third section of a taiji form. Special consideration will be given to the relationship between taiji exercise, healthcare, and disease prevention. Through the advanced study of a taiji form, students will strengthen their understanding of the harmonized relationship between the external and internal environments, between the functions of internal organs and body substances, and between the physical body and the spirit. Attention is paid to integrating taiji with acupuncture and Oriental medicine for balance and disease prevention.

MB0301  Qigong 1       

0/12/0/1  Prereq.: None

Terms Offered: Varies

This three-course series focuses on basic qigong exercises that generate and increase the cultivation of qi to develop strength, grace, concentration, flexibility, balance, and an abundance of genuine energy. Study includes qigong practice guidelines and safety precautions. Students will explore the therapeutic application of qigong for the management and prevention of diseases of the internal organs and musculoskeletal systems. Students will explore channel distribution, point energetics, and internal organ functions to integrate qigong exercise with the theory and practice of acupuncture and Oriental medicine.

MB0302  Qigong 2

0/12/0/1  Prereq.: MB0301

Terms Offered: Varies

This is the second course of the qigong series, focusing on sensing the flow of energy and balancing the body with the mind. These qigong exercises strengthen awareness of acupuncture meridians and point locations along with their organ connections, regulate various systems of the human body, and enrich mind–body therapy. Students will gain a comprehensive understanding of the philosophy of qi through integrating Oriental medicine and daily practice of qigong, recognizing that qi theory is the basis of acupuncture and Oriental medicine.

MB0303  Qigong 3        

0/12/0/1  Prereq.: MB0302

Terms Offered: Varies

The third course of the series focuses on additional qigong exercises to cultivate inner energy, balance the body with the mind, and improve flexibility and psychosomatic relaxation. Qigong exercises guide students toward understanding the mechanisms of lifestyle-related  and  psychosomatic diseases as students explore the prevention and management of modern diseases through the practice of qigong, acupuncture, and Oriental medicine. Through the qigong series, students develop their experiential practice, begin to sense qi, its movement, and its cultivation.

Herbal Studies

AOMA’s herbal program is one of the most comprehensive in the nation, with education in the theory, identification, and function of more than 300 herbs and the combination of those herbs in formulas to restore states of health. Resources include an herbal lab, an herbal medicine center, which stocks more than 350 herbs in bulk and powdered form, patent formulas, tablets, capsules, and extracts, and a learning garden where herbs are grown in conjunction with the American Botanical Council.

HT0103  Chinese Herbology 1

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: AT0102

Co-req.: HL01 Terms Offered: Spring, Fall

This in-depth study of the Chinese materia medica is composed of three courses with an emphasis on properties, channels entered, actions, indications and contraindications, dosages, and major combinations of plant, animal, and mineral substances, as well as preparation and herbal safety. This first course of the series covers theories of siqi, wuwei, guijin, and paozhi, along with substances  that release the exterior, clear heat, downward drain, and drain dampness.

HL01  Chinese Herbal Studies Lab 1

0/12/0/0.5  Co-req.: HT0103

Terms Offered: Spring, Fall

This practical series is taken concurrently with the Chinese Herbology series and focuses on herbal botanical knowledge, recognition of a variety of raw herbs, familiarity of categories and  their functions, and an understanding of the four flavors and five tastes of Chinese substances. The course includes an introduction to basic herbal safety and herb–drug interaction theories. The first lab is a practical study of substances that release to the exterior, clear heat, downward drain, and drain dampness.

HT0200  Nutrition and Dietary Therapy

36/0/0/3  Co-req.: AT0103

Terms Offered: Spring, Summer

This course is an introduction to theoretical principles and the practical application of traditional Chinese dietetics. Topics include the history of nutrition, the five elements, the flavors of foods, the directional movements of foods, the energetic profiles of foods, and treatment of TCM disease patterns with dietary therapy.

HT0201  Chinese Herbology 2

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: HT0103  Co-req.: HL02

Terms Offered: Fall, Winter

Continuation of the in-depth study of Chinese materia medica substances, including those that expel wind-dampness and resolve phlegm, as well as aromatics that transform dampness, relieve food stagnation, regulate qi, regulate blood, and warm the interior.

HL02  Chinese Herbal Studies Lab 2

0/12/0/0.5  Co-req.: HT0201

Terms Offered: Fall, Winter

Practical study of Chinese materia medica substances that expel wind-dampness and resolve phlegm, as well as aromatics that transform dampness, relieve food stagnation, regulate qi, regulate blood, and warm the interior.

HT0202  Chinese Herbology 3

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: HT0103   Co-req.: HL03

Terms Offered: Winter, Spring

Final course on the in-depth study of Chinese materia medica substances, including those that tonify, stabilize and bind, calm spirit, subdue liver yang, extinguish liver wind, open orifices, and expel parasites, as well as external  applications.

HL03  Chinese Herbal Studies Lab 3

0/12/0/0.5  Co-req.: HT0202

Terms Offered: Winter, Spring

Practical study of Chinese materia medica substances that tonify, stabilize and bind, calm spirit, subdue liver yang, extinguish liver-wind, open orifices, and expel parasites, as well as external applications.

HT0203  Chinese Herbal Formulations 1

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: HT0201, HT0202

Terms Offered: Spring, Fall

The first of a three-course series on the Chinese herbal formulas, including compositions, functions, and indications of commonly used formulas. Knowledge of diagnostics and Chinese materia medica is important to the study of the material covered in this course. The  first course is an in-depth study of formulas that release the exterior, drain down, harmonize, and clear  heat.

HT0300  Chinese Patent Herbal Medicine

36/0/0/3 Prereq.: HT0201 or HT0202

Terms Offered: Winter, Summer

This course concerns the study of Chinese patent herbal products and their relationship to traditional herbal formulas, with a focus  on functions of ingredients, indications, contraindications, dosage, and special considerations of commonly used patents. The course includes comparison of popular brands of patents, effectiveness in clinical treatment, storage and duration, format of delivery, safety, quality control, and herb–drug  interactions.

HT0301  Chinese Herbal Formulations 2

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: HT0203 Terms Offered: Fall, Winter

Continuation of an in-depth study of Chinese herbal formulas, including those that treat summer heat, warm the interior, treat both the interior and exterior, tonify deficiency, calm the shen, astringe, regulate qi, and regulate  blood.

HT0302  Chinese Herbal Formulations 3

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: HT0203

Terms Offered: Winter, Spring

Final course on the in-depth study of Chinese herbal formulas, including those that regulate blood (continued), release wind, treat dryness, clear damp, treat phlegm, reduce food stagnation, treat parasites, and treat sores and carbuncles. In addition, students will learn preparations, basic pinyin spelling, pronunciation and meaning of herbal names, and the various categories of single herbs.

HT0311 Syndrome-based Herbs and Formulas

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: AT0212, AT0213, HT0203

Terms Offered: Fall, Winter

This course focuses on advanced herbal application of differentiation methods: eight treatment principles, zangfu organs, six stages and four levels, and their representative herbal formulas. Focus is on clinical herbal application of common syndromes.

HT0322  Chinese Herbal Safety and Herb–Drug Interactions

18/0/0/1.5  Prereq.: HT0201, HT0202, WS0201

Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

Safe application of Chinese materia medica substances and herbal patent medicines, including safe dosages, combinations of toxic and specialty herbs, safety issues of integrating Chinese and modern medicines, contraindications and herbal management for pregnant women and patients with various illnesses, and public safety. This also covers an overview of known interactions between biomedical pharmaceuticals and herbal therapies, with up-to-date information on the consequences and/or benefits of specific drug and herb combinations, herb and nutritional supplement interactions,  accessing this information, and the role of practitioners in educating patients and promoting public health and safety. Course will also cover inherent herbal safety separate from drug interactions, regulatory issues, and FDA  restrictions.

HT0332  Chinese Herbal Treatment of Disease 1

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: HT0301 or HT0302, HT0311

Terms Offered: Winter, Spring

First of a three-course series of the Chinese herbal treatment of disease. Covers the TCM theories of zangfu organs and the theory  of qi, blood, and body fluids as applied to patients with a biomedical diagnosis. The course includes basic disorder patterns of individual zangfu systems and their corresponding treatment strategies, with herbal treatment of diseases of the lung system, heart and cerebral systems, and spleen and stomach systems.

HT0333  Chinese Herbal Treatment of Disease 2

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: HT0332

Terms Offered: Spring, Fall

Second course on the Chinese herbal treatment of disease, including diseases of the liver and gallbladder systems, kidney and bladder systems, qi, blood, and body fluid systems, and musculoskeletal and neurological systems.

HT0394  Huang Di Nei Jing

18/0/0/1.5  Prereq.: HT0301, HT0302   Co-req.: HT0395

Terms Offered: Spring, Fall

Study of the Chinese herbal classics for advanced students, composed of four courses. Fundamental theories and formulas recorded in these books will be analyzed and discussed, with indications and applications to difficult cases and a review of clinical experiences. This first course covers the Huang Di Nei Jing (Yellow Emperor’s Internal Classics).

HT0395  Shan Han Lun

18/0/0/1.5  Prereq.: HT0301, HT0302   Co-req.: HT0394

Terms Offered: Spring, Fall

Study of the Chinese herbal classics for advanced students, composed of four courses. Fundamental theories and formulas recorded in these books will be analyzed and discussed, with indications and applications to difficult cases and a review of clinical experiences. This second course covers the theory of syndrome differentiation according to the Six Channel Stages of the Shang Han Lun (Treatise on Cold Induced Diseases) by Zhang Zhongjing. Attention is given to differences between various related formulas and modifications according to the patient’s changing condition.

HT0431  Chinese Herbal Treatment of Disease 3

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: HT0332

Terms Offered: Fall, Winter

Third course on the Chinese herbal treatment of disease, including herbal treatment under the guidance of the theory of zangfu organs and the theory of qi, blood, and body fluids of TCM for diseases of gynecology, pediatrics, and  dermatology.

HT0442  Jin Gui Yao Lue

18/0/0/1.5  Prereq.: HT0395  Co-req.: HT0443

Terms Offered: Fall, Winter

The third course on Chinese herbal classics covers Jin Gui Yao Lue (Golden Chamber) by Zhang Zhongjing.

HT0443  Wen Bing and Wen Re

18/0/0/1.5  Prereq.: HT0395   Co-req.: HT0442

Terms Offered: Fall, Winter

The fourth course on Chinese herbal classics covers syndrome differentiation according to the four levels theory recorded in Wen  Re Lun (Treatise on Warm Disease) by Ye Tianshi and syndrome differentiation according to the sanjiao theory recorded in Wen Bing Tiao Bian (Differentiation on Febrile Diseases) by Wu Jutong.

RQ0127  Herbal Competencies

0/0/0/0  Prereq.: HL01-03, HT0103, HT0201-0203, HT0300-0302, HT0311,  HT0322, HT0332

Terms Offered: All Terms

This is an online guided study to prepare students for the NCCAOM Chinese Herbology Board Exam. After using the documents and voice-over power points, the student takes AOMA’s Herbal Competency Exam. Passing the competency exams for foundations, acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, and biomedicine is required graduation and before AOMA will release the student’s transcript to NCCAOM. There is no cost for this course, and the competency exam may be retaken until passed.

Biomedical Sciences

AOMA’s biomedical sciences curriculum provides students with a practical foundation of the concepts and diagnostic techniques of biomedicine, enabling them to interface successfully with allopathic practitioners. It is intended to provide students with information applicable to their Chinese medical practice upon becoming licensed practitioners and to enhance their ability to communicate with patients and other practitioners regarding biomedical diagnoses and treatment plans.

WS0101  Anatomy, Physiology, and Histology 1

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: None

Terms Offered: Summer, Fall, Winter

This three-course series provides a foundation in gross anatomy, physiology, and histology. The first course covers terminology, anatomical orientation, tissue types and composition, integumentary system, skeletal and muscular systems, and structure and function of joints, head, and neck, with special emphasis on surface anatomy.

WS0102  Anatomy and Physiology 2

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: WS0101

Terms Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

The second course in this series covers the anatomy and function of upper and lower limb girdles, with an emphasis on shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee, and ankle joints, the structural and functional anatomy of the nervous system, the concept of neural synapse, synaptic transmission, neural plexuses, autonomic nervous system, anatomy and function of the respiratory tract, and the mechanics of respiration.

WS0103  Anatomy and Physiology 3

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: WS0102

Terms Offered: Winter, Spring, Summer

The third course in this series covers the anatomy and function of cardiovascular, lymphatic, hematopoietic, gastrointestinal, urinary, reproductive, and endocrinal systems.

WS0104  Medical Biology

36/0/0/3  Co-req.: WS0101, WS0110

Terms Offered: Fall, Winter

This is an introduction to concepts of biology important in the medical sciences. The course considers the chemical basis for life, cell structure and function, metabolism, mitosis and meiosis, inheritance patterns, molecular biology, anatomy and physiology, organization of the plant and animal kingdoms, and evolution within ecosystems. This course is designed to prepare students for medical biochemistry, the anatomy and physiology series, introduction to microbiology, and the pathophysiology series. This is a non-degree course required for entry into the DAcOM for students who do not have basic biology in their undergraduate studies.

WS0105  Medical Biochemistry

36/0/0/3  Co-req.: WS0102

Terms Offered: Fall, Winter

This is an introduction to concepts of biochemistry important in the medical sciences. The course considers basic biochemistry, the periodic table, nomenclature, atomic structure and bonding, biochemical compounds and reactions, enzymology, cellular communication, DNA structure and synthesis, transcription and translation, gene regulation, energy and metabolism, hormonal regulatory systems. The course is designed to prepare students for the study of human physiology, nutrition and functional medicine, pharmacognosy, and treatment strategies. This is a non-degree course required for entry into the DAcOM for students who do not have basic chemistry in their undergraduate studies.

WS0110  Biomedical Terminology

24/0/0/2  Prereq.: None

Terms Offered: Summer, Fall, Winter

Introduction to basic medical terminology used in the clinical practice of medicine. The course will provide an introduction to word parts and their definitions, pathological conditions, diagnostic and laboratory procedures, and  abbreviations and symbols through a body-system approach. This is a hybrid course whereby a portion of the class is conducted in the classroom and the remainder is online. Content as well as assignments are provided by both methods.

WS0120  Public Health and Biomedical Survey

12/0/0/1  Prereq.: None

Terms Offered: Summer, Winter

Overview of the current and historical health of the general population of the United States, the role of government in healthcare, past and present health challenges facing communities, and the role of healthcare providers.

WS0132  Microbiology and General Pathophysiology

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: WS0101, WS0110   Co-req.: WS0102

Terms Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

The first of a two-course series focusing on the fundamentals of disease process, stress, role of genetics and different age groups, and cellular coping mechanisms in health and disease. This first course provides an overview of human pathogenesis and agents of disease with an emphasis on the role of the immune system, the nature of immune deficient states, and the body’s response in terms of inflammation and healing. The course covers cancer, nutritional issues, and chronic fatigue syndrome, and discusses pathologies of  the musculoskeletal and integumentary  systems.

WS0133  Systemic Pathophysiology

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: WS0132  Co-req.: WS0103

Terms Offered: Winter, Spring, Summer

Second of the two-course series on pathophysiology, with an emphasis on diseases affecting the internal organ systems. The course covers diseases commonly seen in the United States  affecting the hematologic, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary pancreatic, reproductive, neurologic, and endocrine systems.

WS0201  Biomedical Pharmacology

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: WS0310 Terms Offered: Spring, Fall

Study of major drug classes of biomedical pharmaceutical products, drug metabolism in the body, modes of action, indications, contraindications, drug–drug interactions, potential herb and nutritional supplement interactions, as well as commonly prescribed drugs and their proprietary brand and generic names.

WS0310  Physical Assessment 1 – Internal Medicine

24/12/0/3  Prereq.: WS0103, WS0133

Terms Offered: Spring, Summer, Fall

This course includes hands-on interview skills, role-playing, data collection, charting, systemic reviews, specific history evaluations, and techniques for auscultation, measuring vital signs, and blood pressure reading. This course introduces the practical principles of basic health assessment for critical recognition of signs and symptoms. Students learn the skills and techniques of respiratory, cardiovascular, and abdominal examinations. This course prepares students to recognize  red  flags  and  take  appropriate actions when necessary. Students gain experience in the use of data for evidence-based management of outcomes for patients with organ/system-based pathologies.

WS0292  Biomedical Diagnostic Techniques: Body Imaging, Fluids Analysis, and Lab Reports

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: WS0310

Terms Offered: Winter, Fall

This course covers the principles of biomedical diagnostic methods with an insight into the basis of ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests, including non-invasive and invasive instrumentational analyses  of diseases and disorders of the human body.

WS0311  Physical Assessment 2 – NeuroMusculSkeletal

24/12/0/3  Prereq.: WS0310, CT2, and initiation of clinical internship

Terms Offered: Winter, Spring

This course enhances students’ clinical practice with the basic skills required for musculoskeletal and neurological assessments. Such assessments are required for objective measurements and allow students to engage  in evidence-based management of outcomes for patients with neuromuscular disorders. As a special feature, sessions are imbedded throughout to make relevant meaning of the assessments for TCM treatment planning and therapeutic applications.

WS0312  Women’s Health: Management of Gynecological and Reproductive Conditions

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: WS0201, WS0292, WS0311

Terms Offered: Fall, Winter

This course focuses on the study of the female reproductive system, including common gynecological and obstetrical diseases, pregnancy risks, management and appropriate advising guidelines, and pathogenesis and diagnostic measurements, as well as mechanics and complications of labor and delivery, psychology of childbirth, and related issues.

WS0393  Biomedical Treatment of Disease 1

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: WS0201, WS0292, WS0311

Terms Offered: Spring, Summer

The first course in a two-course series exploring characteristic features of disease as seen from the biomedical model, with the standard approach to health and disease management, diagnosis, and treatment plans of selected diseases. The first course includes cancer, head  and  neck  disorders, respiratory  ailments, infective and harmful physical agents, nutritive, diabetic, and dermatological disorders, and complementary and alternative medical concepts.

WS0394  Biomedical Treatment of Disease 2

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: WS0201, WS0292, WS0311

Terms Offered: Summer, Fall

The second course in this series covers fluid and electrolyte disorders, cardiovascular, hypertensive, hematological, gastro- intestinal, hepatobiliary-pancreatic, renal-urological, endocrine, musculoskeletal, psychiatric, and neurological disorders.

RQ0128  Biomedicine Competencies

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: AT0202, AT0212, AT221, HT0200, MB0101, MB0301, WS0201, WS0311

Co-req.: PT0400, PT0440

Terms Offered: All Terms

This is an online guided study to prepare students for the NCCAOM Biomedical Board Exam. After using the documents and voice-over power points, the student takes AOMA’s Biomedical Exam. Passing the competency exams for foundations, acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, and biomedicine is required graduation and before AOMA will release the student’s transcript to NCCAOM. There is no cost for this course, and the competency exam may be retaken until passed.

MAcOM Integral Studies

Integral studies courses at AOMA connect concepts interdepartmentally by  educating  learners  in  the  core  values and behaviors of professional practice in Chinese medicine, the integration of Chinese medicine and Western medicine, and the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to be successful in clinical practice.

Through case management, practice management, communication skills, ethics, and evidence-based practice, AOMA emphasizes theskills essential to producing best possible outcomes in patient care and practice. These courses address practical business education and ethics, skills to help students connect with their patients and to provide systems-based healthcare in America, and the importance of research in classical and current literature to promote best possible patient outcomes. MAcOM students may elect to take PT0101 Psychology and Clinical Communications in place of PT0411 Mindfulness Somatic Therapies; however, if PT0101 is taken as an admissions requirement for the DAcOM, both PT0101 and PT0411 must be taken to fulfill DAcOM degree requirements.

PT0101 Psychology and Clinical Communications

36/0/0/3  Co-req.: RQ0115 First clinical practical exam

Terms Offered: Fall, Winter

This course is designed for students to develop and refine their clinical communication skills primarily through reflection and analysis of their own clinic experiences. Students will learn how to deepen their skills in self-care, communicate about sensitive issues, and navigate the psychological dynamics of the practitioner–patient relationship. Topics such as trust, rapport, empathy, projection, transference, professional boundaries, grief, and intuition will be discussed through group study of cases from student clinic. Students may opt to take PT0411 Mindfulness Somatic Therapies for this MAcOM degree requirement. If this course is used for admissions into the DAcOM, then PT0411 Mindfulness Somatic Therapies must be taken for  degree requirements.

AT0221  Case Management 36/0/0/3       

Prereq.: AT0211

Terms Offered: Fall, Winter

This course provides an in-depth examination of the case management process and establishes integrative medicine as a harmonizing framework for Oriental and Western medical case management. Course content includes referral to/from and collaboration with other healthcare professionals, prognosis development, the development of evidence-based plans of care, and the use of predetermined evaluation criteria for assessing the results of treatment.

PT0400  Practice Management

36/0/0/3  Prereq.:  None

Terms Offered: Winter, Summer

This course focuses on the crucial information and skills required   to successfully establish and manage an Oriental medicine practice. The course is taught in collaboration with a range of community experts in fields such as marketing, tax planning, risk management, billing, and insurance, as well as Oriental medical professionals with experience in a variety of clinical  settings.

PT0411  Mindfulness Somatic Therapies

27/9/0/3  Co-req.: RQ0122 Second clinical practical exam

Terms Offered: Fall, Spring

This  course  is  focused  on  developing  advanced  communications skills and improving clinical outcomes with patients using innovative, body-centered awareness and attunement in clinical practice.

Through lecture, demonstration, experiential exercises, and clinical practice, a clinical style of working with the direct experience of qi  will be developed. With presence and mindfulness as the foundation, the communication skills of tracking, contact, and directing practitioner and patient awareness will be discussed and practiced. Woven throughout the learning and practice of skills, the theory and application of the Five Phases will be presented as a framework to organize information about the mind–body–spirit interface; how qi is expressed in health; the energetic process of transformation; and how to energetically attune with clients in order to diagnose and intervene effectively. Students may opt to take PT0101 Psychology and Clinical Communications for this MAcOM degree requirement. If PT0101 is used for admissions into the DAcOM, then PT0411 must be taken for degree requirements.

PT0440  Ethics and Legal Issues

24/0/0/2  Prereq.: None

Terms Offered: Winter, Summer

Discussion of ethical and legal issues typically encountered in an acupuncture and Oriental medical practice. Topics include informed consent, scope of practice, record keeping, legal requirements, release of data, ethical and legal aspects of referring patients to another practitioner, professional conduct, and appropriate interpersonal behavior. Also includes patient expectations, general liability insurance, professional liability insurance, risk management, quality assurance, and privacy issues.

WS0302  Evidence-Based Medicine in CAM Practice

36/0/0/3  Prereq.: WS0201, WS0311, AT0213

Terms Offered: Winter, Spring

This course focuses on the judicious and valid use of research and expert opinion in the clinical care of patients. The course broadly addresses the research process and applies it to the concept of evidence-based medicine and practice. The topics of the course include the history of medicine, research ethics, research terminology, issues in Western and Oriental medical research, literature  research methods, the  academic  peer-review  process, and issues in research application. The focus will be on the critique and evaluation of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) literature and how to apply a systematic review of evidence-based literature to improve CAM  treatments.

MAcOM Clinical Internship

AOMA’s clinical education provides students with hands-on experience and a service to the greater Austin community. At AOMA, clinical education begins in the first term and continues throughout the first year with a sequence of clinical theater and observation. Supervised clinical internship begins in the second year and goes on to include 972 hours of internship, focused  herbal and community clinic hours, and optional hours focused   on tuina and medical qigong. Throughout the internship, students take on increasing levels of responsibility for patient care and  case management, and attend regular intern meetings to support their education and professional development. Finally, as they progress through the program, students compile a portfolio of their work, including, for example, self-reflections, clinical case studies, and selected coursework. A detailed description of clinical requirements is included in the Student & Clinic Manual. Note: In the course descriptions below, “x” indicates the section number of the clinic.

CT111  Clinical Theater 1

0/0/36/1.5  Co-req.: AT0101

Terms Offered: Summer, Fall, Winter

Students are exposed to the diagnostic methods of TCM and to the techniques and application of acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine by  observing  professional treatments performed by a member of the AOMA faculty. The course includes discussion on how to conduct a patient interview and administer a complete acupuncture treatment, with emphasis on patient communication and ethics.

CT112  Clinical Theater 2

0/0/36/1.5  Prereq.: CT111, CL1xxO

Co-req.: AT0211, AT0132, HT0103, HL01, WS0311

Terms Offered: Fall, Winter, Spring

This clinical readiness course provides a clinic-like environment and atmosphere with intensive hands-on education on the procedures  of clinical treatment, including communication skills, ten questions, diagnosis, treatment strategies, and performance and charting. Clinical Theater 2 must be taken the term before entry into internship. Please refer to the current Student & Clinic Manual for all requirements  of internship.

CL1xxO  Clinical Observation

0/0/36/1.5   Co-req.: AT0101  and RQ0103 Clinic Observation Orientation

Terms Offered: All

Students learn basic observation skills and record their observations of the case presentations and treatment protocols in notebooks. A minimum of two Clinical Observation sessions totaling 72 hours is required before entry into internship.

CL1xxI  Clinical Internship

0/0/36/1.5   Prereq.: See Student and Clinic Manual

Terms Offered: All

As a supervised intern, the student performs the intake, diagnosis, and treatment, consulting with his/her supervisor  on the case. The supervisor monitors the intern and provides guidance and evaluation in his/her diagnosis, treatment plan, point location, acupuncture techniques, and herbal formulation. With accumulated clinical internship hours, additional emphasis is placed on professional conduct and appropriate interpersonal behavior, understanding the scope of practice, maintaining confidentiality, developing communication skills, managing psychological reactions that arise, making appropriate referrals, as well as maintaining charts, record keeping, legal requirements, release of data, and other related issues.

CL2xxI  Clinical Internship – Community 0/0/36/1.5             

Prereq.: See Student & Clinic Manual

Terms Offered: All

Student interns perform treatments in a designated community clinic under the supervision of AOMA clinical supervisors. See Student & Clinic Manual for details.

CL118O  Advanced Clinical Observation

0/0/36/1.5   Co-req.: CL1xxI

Prereq.: See Student & Clinic Manual Terms Offered: All

Focused on deepening and widening the student’s knowledge   and experience, the Advanced Clinical Observation is offered to students who have achieved more than 600 clinical hours. Student interns learn different styles of acupuncture and herbal treatment from veteran practitioners. Different acupuncture skills and techniques and herbal modification experiences are shared. Student interns also have case discussions together with practitioners.

CL1xxH  Clinical Internship – Herbal

0/0/36/1.5   Prereq.: See Student & Clinic Manual Co-req.: HT0332

Terms Offered: All

In this specialty clinic, students receive supervision and education specifically in Chinese herbal treatment of common clinical diseases, using herbal formulation with modifications as well as Chinese patent herbs. A minimum of 72 hours of herbal clinic internship is required for graduation.

CL1xxHD  Clinical Internship – Herbal Dispensary

0/0/36/1.5   Prereq.: See Student & Clinic Manual Co-req.: HT0332

Terms Offered: All

In  this  specialty  clinic,  students  receive  supervision,  education, and experience specifically in dispensing Chinese herbal remedies, including patents, bulk prescriptions, and powdered preparations.Students  gain  additional  competencies,  including  monitoring stock for depletion and expiration, stocking new and replenishing materials, and use of manufacturers’ reference manuals on natural medicinal products. A minimum of 36 hours of herbal dispensary internship is required for  graduation.

CT311  Advanced Herbal and Biomedical Clinic Theater

0/0/36/1.5   Prereq.: RQ0122 Second clinical practical exam, HT0311, HT0202 or HT0203, and WS0201, WS0292, WS0223, WS0311

Co-req.: HT0332 and one of WS0312, WS0393, or WS0394 Terms Offered: Fall, Winter

In this advanced course in clinical education, students are exposed to the integration of both TCM and biomedical diagnostic methods and the methods by which biomedicine may be used to inform the application of Chinese herbology in a clinical acupuncture setting. Experienced AOMA faculty with TCM and biomedical backgrounds will lead professional interventions for patients. This course includes discussion of the patient interview and combines TCM and biomedical diagnostic methods for an herbal and acupuncture treatment, with emphasis on patient communication, physical assessment, pulse and tongue diagnosis, and herbal modification, as appropriate for each case. Students will be expected to write advanced case studies of their own.

MAcOM Electives

AT0240  Psycho-emotional Frameworks in TCM

24/12/0/3                             

Terms Offered: Spring

This course will cover a number of the conceptual models used in TCM to address psycho-emotional disorders. It will cover the five elements and their virtues and emotions, the eight extraordinary vessels as a framework of the self, the five shen, the zang fu and their emotional functions, and the window of sky points. Diagnosis and treatment protocols will be discussed via these approaches for a variety of pathologies such as anxiety and depression.

ABS01  Shiatsu for Acupuncturists

0/24/0/2 Prereq: AT0100, AT0111

Terms Offered: Summer

The principle focus of this course is to introduce and develop the skill set and attitude necessary for the practical integration of Shiatsu into acupuncture treatments. It is an 8-week elective course designed to introduce students to the basic philosophy and skills of Shiatsu, in a manner that will be easily integrated into their acupuncture practice. In addition, this course develops the novice’s ability to feel qi sensations through basic awareness and qigong exercises, to cultivate awareness of self and others, to attune to psychosocial cultures around touch, and to gain permission to touch through verbal and non-verbal cues. It will also seek to create a framework to integrate Western/biomedical assessments into the practice.

AT0203  Acupuncture Systems: Theories, Styles, and Techniques

24/12/0/3  Prereq.: AT0112, AT0113, AT0191,  AT1092, AT0132, AT0202

Terms Offered: Spring, Fall

As an advanced practical course, it provides an overview of other acupuncture practices including various theories and techniques for clinical application.  See course schedules for instructor and styles/systems available.

Other MAcOM and DAcOM Curricular Requirements

Other MAcOM and DAcOM Curricular Requirements

AOMA’s programs have several curricular requirements that either fall outside of typical courses and clinical rotations. Already listed in the above departments include RQ0125 Acupuncture Competencies, RQ0126 Foundations Competencies, RQ0127 Chinese Herbal Competencies, and RQ0128 Biomedical Competencies.  The following is a list of other such requirements. Some of these are done online or through other organizations.

RQ0010                New Student Orientation

RQ0101                HIPAA Training

RQ0102                OSHA Training

RQ0103                Clinical Observation Orientation

RQ0104                Clinical Internship Orientation

RQ0105                CNT Certificate

RQ0106                CPR Certificate

RQ0108                Pre-Internship Checklist

RQ0110                Benchmark Exam (Pre-Internship)

RQ0111                First Formative Portfolio Review

RQ0114                Student Meetings (every term)

RQ0115                Level 1 Practical Exam

RQ0116                Level 1 Checklist

RQ0121                Second Formative Portfolio Review

RQ0122                Level 2 Practical Exam

RQ0123                Level 2 Checklist

RQ0134                Third Formative Portfolio Review

RQ0135                Summative Portfolio Review

RQ0136                Level 3 Checklist

RQ0137                Herbalist Checklist

RQ0138                MAcOM Group Exit Interview

RQ0144                Case Report and Presentation (DAcOM only)

RQ0145                DAcOM Portfolio and QIP (DAcOM Only)